Today Should Count

I’m counting down towards something I’m not particularly looking forward to (and it’s not related to writing). For the last few days I’ve been saying, “x days”, not counting the current day.

I picture optimism and pessimism as a spectrum, let’s call it emotional outlook. For the sake of a good analogy it’s a vertical line. Buried in the dark depths, is pessimism. Towards the top of the line, way up in the lofty sun-drenched heights, sits optimism. At the very top of the line is idealism. Depending your own emotional outlook is where you place realism.

In my detailed bio: the early years I recount how I was originally optimistic, but became pessimistic. Then, my patient and persistent wife, encouraged and cajoled my temperament back toward the optimistic end of the scale.

(Sidebar: As I write that sentence I consider the writing guideline of not adding too many adjectives. I’ve said my wife is (1) patient and (2) persistent. Both adjectives are relevant to the subject matter and therefore appropriate. But to not mention her beauty is to almost to deceive through omission, dear reader).

My point is this: today should count (especially if it’s less than 75% done). Make the most of every opportunity. Start that diet immediately, ring that friend, cross off that item on your list (after doing it).

 

A Strategy for Productivity

Years ago I did some management studies. It was a massive amount of work (when coupled with actually working at the same time), but also very enjoyable. I appreciated the brain-expansion and exposure to new knowledge.

One of the articles I read was ‘Getting things done: The science behind stress-free productivity’ by Francis Heylighten and Clement Vidal. My guess is, almost everyone wishes they were more productive, so I thought I’d share some of the article insights.

“GTD” is a simple and practical method for knowledge workers to manage busy days and ensure maximum personal productivity.

GTD-Workflow-Diagram.PNG
Source: http://www.eproductivity.com/dx/GTD-Workflow-Diagram.pdf/$file/GTD-Workflow-Diagram.pdf

The flowchart defines how work should be processed. In summary, if it’s a 2 minute task it should be done immediately, otherwise it should be allocated time in the future, with prompt-actions created.

The article contains reasoning on how the brain works (and therefore why the system works).  For example, the long-term memory has good recognition but poor recall; the short-term memory holds 7 items in active memory, and the energy required to actively remember something in the short-term is high.

Here were the points in the article I highlighted:

  • As much as possible, offload your mind by storing information/thoughts in a trusted external memory (paper, computer), in a structured format that is easily retrievable.
  • Record this information in an “actionable” form (so it reminds you what needs to be done).  Hopefully to stop you leaving a vague message that becomes cryptic after 5 minutes.
  • Be efficient with your actions.  (i.e. if you’re in close proximity to a task, do them now). When you’re doing a task make sure that you’re in an environment, with the proper tools, to perform that task with maximum effectiveness. “strike while the iron is hot.”
  • Switching to different tasks (mentally and physically) costs time and energy, so minimize job transitions (avoid disruptions).
  • When an ‘opportunity’ arises, but cannot be taken (due to current priorities) file it away in a ‘someday/maybe’ file, so the opportunity is not entirely forgotten.
  • GTD manages from the bottom (concrete issues you have to deal with) rather than from the top (high-level goals and values). It points out that if you try planning downwards you will simply be overwhelmed by the number of possibilities you have to take into account.
  • Each time you have performed one of these tasks, mark it off and write the next action.  In this way all of your project(s) are moving forward.

None of these suggestions are ground-breaking, but if applied consistently I believe it would increase my productivity. As a writer, I have two immediate take-aways: clean my workspace up and avoid “broswing” on the Internet.

Right: blog post written (or read) *check*.

Move onto your next task, and good luck.