The Danger of Boring Bits

I must begin this by saying every reader is different. What I find fascinating you might consider yawn-worthy, and visa versa. Grammar and punctuation are largely objective, the quality of a story is subjective: beauty (or ugliness) is in the eye of the beholder.

Last weekend I was reading a novel which I felt sure I’d be blogging about by name, encouraging you all to run out and buy. It’s been a while since I’ve read anything I found so engaging.

I was staying up late to read and reaching for the book within minutes of my eyelids opening. All other pursuits and activities were put on hold as I read eager to discover what happened next. After investing half the weekend reading I’d made significant progress.

person-731165_960_720And then the character moved to a different situation, and my interest began to wane. I slogged through increasing boredom, knowing the situation would have to change soon. Surely? Multiple chapters later I was still stuck in the same place. I started to skip pages, then whole chapters and still I was stuck in the swamp of boredom.

As I closed the book for the last time on Sunday evening I know the swamp is coming to the end. The character is about to change setting, drawing this section to a close.

The only problem is I’m not sure I care any more. Even though the story before this point was great, I’ve lost interest. The book will probably return to its former glory, but what if it doesn’t? As I feel now I may never finish the book.

Perhaps the fault is my own. Maybe in those skipped pages and chapters I’ve missed some crucial element, that would have made the boredom worthwhile. But I doubt it.

I feel as though I was knocked out of the story. Boring bits cost the goodwill of the reader, and if the cost is too high the book goes down. Chances are, I’ll be more hesitant to pick up a book by the same author again. The realisation of just how detrimental boring bits are, has caused me to be even more wary of writing them in the future.


For the next month I don’t plan to do much writing, if any, with the exception of blogging. I have some programming that I need to do. I’m involved in running a men’s group at my church, and to help it to run smoother I need to develop some software.

I suspect it will be a considerable amount of work; hopefully I can get it done within a month. Then I’ll be back to writing (which I’m already looking forward too).

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Skit: Mates Stick Together

About a month ago I blogged about a bit of fun that I’d had experimenting with skit (short-play) writing. I thought I’d share it and then provide some brief explanations as to the choices I made while writing it.

The skit was designed for church, as a bit of a promo of Men’s Ministry. The purpose of the men’s ministry is to support the men of the church, and to build a culture of doing life together. Life can be hard and it is important that we have some close mates or other men we trust who we can rely on. They can help or give a slap on the back of the head (Gibbs-style) as required.

I’m also passionate about healthy marriages. If the relationship between spouses is good, it is a blessing to the entire family unit. And marriage can be hard. Really hard. My early years of marriage would have been a lot easier if I’d had someone who could give experience-earned wisdom.

And so it is with these two foci that I wrote this skit.

skit1-1skit1-2skit1-3skit1-4

As you probably noticed I hit on several themes: mateship, marriage difficulties, work stresses, pornography/lust.

The way it plays out in my head also contains some humour: the prancing of the devil, the devil eating the husband’s snacks, the man in the towel with a frying pan. I was hoping that the humour lightens the subject matter and provides something that will be remembered.

There is also a good helping of truth in the skit:

  • How the man and woman are biblically supposed to act toward one another.
  • How a wise person’s response to challenge is to ask for help.
  • How we should be there for one another in times of need, even if it means abandoning all considerations of fashion sense or pride.
  • Even with others willing to help, they can’t help unless we agree to be helped.

And that, dear readers, is my first attempt at writing a skit.