A Strategy for Productivity

Years ago I did some management studies. It was a massive amount of work (when coupled with actually working at the same time), but also very enjoyable. I appreciated the brain-expansion and exposure to new knowledge.

One of the articles I read was ‘Getting things done: The science behind stress-free productivity’ by Francis Heylighten and Clement Vidal. My guess is, almost everyone wishes they were more productive, so I thought I’d share some of the article insights.

“GTD” is a simple and practical method for knowledge workers to manage busy days and ensure maximum personal productivity.

GTD-Workflow-Diagram.PNG
Source: http://www.eproductivity.com/dx/GTD-Workflow-Diagram.pdf/$file/GTD-Workflow-Diagram.pdf

The flowchart defines how work should be processed. In summary, if it’s a 2 minute task it should be done immediately, otherwise it should be allocated time in the future, with prompt-actions created.

The article contains reasoning on how the brain works (and therefore why the system works).  For example, the long-term memory has good recognition but poor recall; the short-term memory holds 7 items in active memory, and the energy required to actively remember something in the short-term is high.

Here were the points in the article I highlighted:

  • As much as possible, offload your mind by storing information/thoughts in a trusted external memory (paper, computer), in a structured format that is easily retrievable.
  • Record this information in an “actionable” form (so it reminds you what needs to be done).  Hopefully to stop you leaving a vague message that becomes cryptic after 5 minutes.
  • Be efficient with your actions.  (i.e. if you’re in close proximity to a task, do them now). When you’re doing a task make sure that you’re in an environment, with the proper tools, to perform that task with maximum effectiveness. “strike while the iron is hot.”
  • Switching to different tasks (mentally and physically) costs time and energy, so minimize job transitions (avoid disruptions).
  • When an ‘opportunity’ arises, but cannot be taken (due to current priorities) file it away in a ‘someday/maybe’ file, so the opportunity is not entirely forgotten.
  • GTD manages from the bottom (concrete issues you have to deal with) rather than from the top (high-level goals and values). It points out that if you try planning downwards you will simply be overwhelmed by the number of possibilities you have to take into account.
  • Each time you have performed one of these tasks, mark it off and write the next action.  In this way all of your project(s) are moving forward.

None of these suggestions are ground-breaking, but if applied consistently I believe it would increase my productivity. As a writer, I have two immediate take-aways: clean my workspace up and avoid “broswing” on the Internet.

Right: blog post written (or read) *check*.

Move onto your next task, and good luck.

Jumping the Productivity Moat

Although revision on Vengeance Will Come has only just begun I’m reasonably happy with the progress so far.

Revision Work…

Here’s a summary of what I’m looking at:

  • I’m Cutting out superfluous words. Not just the occasional word in a sentence, but also entire sentences. For example, the following line of dialogue:

“Physical muscles are less important than mental strength and wisdom, neither of which is guaranteed by age.”

I originally wrote it as a subtle dig at a character that he was physically weak, to feed a sense of inadequacy. That reference is no longer required and its presence is now out-of-place. It adds no value and causes only distraction. The delete key fixed that.

  • Word choice. Sometimes I’m using the same word in quick succession and that is poor form. (Sidebar: A previous Writing Excuses podcast I listened to mentioned that there are some words you can only use once in a story).
  • Using contractions in dialogue. This, strangely doesn’t come naturally to me. Although I speak with them, for some reason I write long-form. My flow-of-consciousness dialogue tends to be formal and so feels scripted. It was something an earlier version alpha reader detected, and I was trying to fix this… obviously I missed a lot. I suspect the further into the story the less I detected.
  • being more descriptive about motion and emotion; trying to show in a more nuanced way, instead of telling the reader.
  • Evaluating the criticisms of my beta readers, and adjusting accordingly (more about that in another post).

…Meets Productivity Moat

But then my forward progress is halted, midway through chapter 2 (of 29). I’ve hit a piece of text that’s really slowing me down: a productivity moat that’s blocking my path.

I’m not happy with the paragraph of text and are indecisive about wording and positioning. Several times I have opened up the document and sat there looking at it, as though it were written in Swahili (which I can’t read). After an annoying ten minutes of staring, my enthusiasm begins to wane. Stupid moat. I’ve tried to skip it and move on, but it’s like I know it’s there like an enemy at my flank and it’s on my mind.

I have a new strategy. To be honest it’s not much different from my previous strategies, but often I’ve found writing is a mind game. So if my slightly modified strategy works – hooray. They say you need an edge over your enemy: not a whole new weapon, just an edge.

I’m going to:

  1. Highlight the paragraph, admit to myself that I currently lack the ability to solve it and I can’t allow it to slow me down.
  2. Write some extensive comments: what I think is wrong with it (why I am having difficulty) and any possible options I can see to fix it in the future. I’m going to try to be descriptive e.g. “Z might work but that would require Y (which I don’t have)”.
  3. I’m going to move on, having done everything I can currently.
  4. At a later date, either at the end or when the answer presents itself, I’ll go back and fix it.

The productivity moat may cause a change in strategy, but it won’t stop me.