4 Book Reviews

It’s been about a month and a half since I posted my last book review. Although my reading has slowed as I got back into writing, I’ve still been reading. In fact, after watching Netflix’s Inside Bill Gates’ Brain it inspired me to read more. Bill always carries around approximately 15 books on a myriad of non-fiction subjects. Apparently he reads at a phenomenal rate and retains most of it in memory. While I can’t achieve that, I know reading is beneficial.

For this week, I thought I’d take a break from sharing my novelette Escape from Hell. At three chapters in, the character has just made it to Hell and if you haven’t read the story yet now is the perfect time to catch up. Next week I’ll share the fourth chapter.

I’ve read a number of books in the last couple of months, so it’s time for a quick-splattering of review, and some writing insights these books have provided.

The most recent I finished was Michael Connelly’s Two Kinds of Truth. (Genre: Crime Fiction). Bosch is simultaneously trying to solve a double-murder and clear his name from a corruption allegation made by a serial rapist.

I believe this is the third Bosch novel I’ve read, and enjoyed. Connelly does a great job of bringing in some flavour with the faint-yet-visible emotional struggles of his characters.

One thing that is interesting is the pattern that Connelly seems to have. Bosch always seems to be solving two crimes simultaneously. There always seems to be two plots. I’m trying to remember (and failing) if one plot gets more ‘page time’ than the other? I this particular case, the serial rapist is coming up for a slam-dunk get-out-of-jail-free court case in a week. That puts a timer on the plot; Bosch has a week to prove he didn’t plant evidence. The inclusion of two main plots adds to the drama, making the reader feel more tension and the weariness of Bosch. He’s juggling a lot of balls in the air, which also gels well with what we see about detectives on TV.

Tiamat’s Wrath is book 8 of The Expanse series by the authors known as James S. A. Corey. (Genre: Science Fiction) This series I have previously raved about.

In some ways I don’t think I can give a fair review of this book. I completed the read over a month ago and memories fade. More impactfully, I was mistakenly thinking it was the last book as I read it. (It is instead, the penultimate). Whenever I read a ‘last book’ in a series I always hold myself back a little: as though I don’t want to enjoy it too much, because it’s coming to an end. Consequently I highlighted fewer passages than normal, I believe a symptom of my end-of-series malady rather than the relative quality of the book.

The lines I did appreciate though:

  • Carrie Fisk of the Association of Worlds […] with the governors […] fighting to be the first one laughing at her jokes.
  • Growing older was a falling away of everything that didn’t matter. And a deepening appreciation of all the parts that were important enough to stay.
  • It was cunning almost to the point of wisdom.
  • “You take care of your tools, your tools take care of you.”
  • Naomi’s role in the underground, the underground’s ability to survive, everything was radically uncertain. They papered over the gaps with hospitality and kindness.
  • Timothy watched her like she was giving birth and he wasn’t a doctor. The visible understanding that there was probably something he should be doing to help, but he didn’t know what it was.
  • Evolution was a paste-and-baling-wire process that came up with half-assed solutions like pushing teeth through babies’ gums and menstruation. Survival of the fittest was a technical term that covered a lot more close-enough-is-close-enough than actual design.
  • Two men, each convinced of their exceptionalism, were capable of leapfrogging over vast chasms of maybe-this-isn’t-a-great-idea and this-is-totally-illegal.
  • “He’s dead. I saw it.”
    “So they’ve told me. He was a good . . . Well, he wasn’t really exactly a good person. He cared enough to try, anyway. But he was loyal as hell.”
    Holden paused. “He was my brother. I loved him.”
  • Being reminded that they’d been building roads through a dragon’s mouth left him jumpy.
  • This place is made out of palace intrigue and fear as much as it is concrete
  • Dreams were fragile things to build with. Titanium and ceramic lasted longer.
  • Naomi stepped over and put her arms around him. It was like hugging a metal strut.

The interesting words in this book: pearlescent, tisane, orrery, gestalt, anthropomorphizing, Heliosphere, interminable, bioluminescence and gratis.

(Genre: Legal Thriller) In The Gods of Guilt by Michael Connelly, we follow the character Bosch’s half-brother, Mickey Halley, a defence lawyer.

I enjoy the cross-over that occurs between Halley and Bosch books. The characters, float in and out, as you’d expect in a family relationship where they both work the same patch (crime).

It’s a solid book with twists and turns in the plot. I’d have to say I like Bosch books better; maybe because it’s easier to relate to the hero cop than the defence lawyer who can be a little greasy at times. It’s interesting that the two Connelly books are similar in many ways. One involves crooked cops, the other crooked lawyers.

(Both of the Michael Connelly books were read in hard-cover, so I can’t provide highlights. I’m one of these people who can’t ‘mark’ a book up).

I picked up Messages by John Hileman for free during a promotional event, and one should not look a gift-horse in the mouth.

It’s a faith-based story, and I think those are particularly hard. It’s pushing a message, without trying to over-push…a tight rope to walk. It’s also hard to know who your audience is: are you writing for Christians (who might know and understand the belief system), or for non-Christians (in which case the approach has to be entirely different, I think).

The best of my highlights:

  • “You know what is right, and what is wrong, because God has put it in you to know. But there are many who hear lies, and for whatever reason, be it wealth, sex, power, you name it, they give their ear to the lies. Something inside them chooses the lie over what they know is truth, and slowly, almost imperceptibly, they begin to allow their heart to be calloused, until they are no longer bothered by the evil, because they have justified it in their own mind.”
  • The second hand made its way around with no regard for the violence it would bring
  • “Why does God let bad stuff happen to good people, even people who are trying to do what he wants them to do?”
    “You’re assuming there are good people. … You’re caught up in relativism. You think because you’re not as bad as the next guy, that makes you good. If a thief stood before a judge and said, ‘I know I took all that money from the bank, but I’m not as bad as that other guy who kills people and likes it,’ do you think the judge is going to say, ‘You know, you’re right. You’re a pretty good guy. I’ll let you go.’? Of course not!”

It’s funny how you see your mistakes more easily when others’ make them. In Messages there’s a brief passage where the character receives an email from someone who can’t spell. Those few paragraphs contain spelling errors. I’ve done the same before. Now, reading it, without the I-wrote-this-bias, I don’t recommend it. It comes off tacky.

Also, I’m guessing it might have been cold while the story was being written. In fairly close positioning (i.e. several pages only) there were the lines ‘Unconsciousness crept over her like a warm blanket’ and ‘ David’s eyelids slid down like a warm blanket’. Be careful with expressions like this: use them one only.

Some interesting words: vestibule, barcalounger, orneryer.